Treat Trauma In Your Go-Rig

Treat Trauma In Your Go-Rig

December 22, 2018 3 Comments

I’ve spent the majority of my adult life Overlanding. I started with my Jeep Wrangler Sahara, to this day the only vehicle I’ve never sold and will never part with. I frequented Uwharrie National Forest every weekend and spent my free time looking for new trails, new experiences, and new places to visit. When I became a Green Beret my overlanding skillsets in off-road traveling I realized my time off translated well into Mobility in the military. Since I started FieldCraft Survival, the company I co-own with a SF Sniper team mate of mine we have coined the term Every Day Mobility or EDM, and for us it’s looking at your vehicle as an extension of your rucksack. Those lessons we learned overlanding in Iraq, Afghanistan, Yemen, Libya, Pakistan, Tajikistan, and Africa, they all taught us a specific method of applying this mind set, and how we carry our equipment to enable our survival. Coming home from War I saw the importance of carrying trauma kit in my vehicle overseas-not just in stowed equipment, but readily accessible equipment-equipment that you could obtain when you needed it the most. This for me hit home hard one spring day in Fayetteville, NC. I was weeks back from an Iraq trip as a Sniper in 3rd Special Forces Group when I saw my Team Sgt riding his motorcycle with his wife in front of me. It was a sunny Saturday morning and I was on the way to the range to shoot with friends. As I waved to my Team Sgt, he pulled in front of me and started creating distance. As we rounded a bend in the road it happened. A car pulled out in front of him and they hit the side of the car going around 45mph. I immediately sourced my trauma bag which was made up of the same trauma kit you would see in combat. Despite the complacency that’s been bred, trauma is universal in the sense that you will see similar injuries like compound fractures, head trauma, major arterial bleeds in and around vehicles as you would see in a war zone. I grabbed my first aid bag and ran to not only my bosses side, but a man who was a great friend. Tragically his wife died instantly and I tried my best to keep him alive. I applied a cat tourniquet from North American Rescue, I applied a chest seal and needle decompressed a sucking chest wound caused by a laceration over his ribs. I monitored his symptoms and gave it my all, but that day the best trauma equipment and medical skills wouldn’t save him. He tragically passed from a lacerated artery that bled internally and he passed by my side. Since that moment I’ve tried my best to educate the importance of carrying trauma equipment not only on your person, but also your vehicle. Overlanding, off-roading, or simply your Every Day Mobility (EDM) should facilitate your survival. According to a Harvard Health Watch study the average American spends 101 minutes in their car a day or 38,000 hrs... that’s over 4 years in a car in your lifetime. Since we started the company we have taught overland courses that include medical training and this is just the beginning. Take your EDM serious and always be prepared. It’s not only a passion to teach others how to save their own lives, but a promise I made to those that are no longer here. Stay Alert-Stay Alive! 


3 Responses

Ern
Ern

September 12, 2019

One of my mentors had bag 4ft by 3ft over stuffed to about 2 foot thick with more big items attached to the outside. He took this bag to the range, when doing serious training, and to large gatherings. I caught the habit from him, started equipping a sling bag with the basics. We would all be better off if we did this for each other not just our selves.

Chris
Chris

March 18, 2019

I have a large rescue bag in my vehicle, but I also carry my med kit & tools with me when I’m out MTB; (1) to be self-sustaining / self-rescuing, (2) for others who do not prepare, (3) for good karma.

I always hear the comments about my “big sack”, “that thing weighs too much”, “hope you don’t fall in the river”, etc. So far no one has ever complained about the meds / bandages / electrolytes / tools / tubes / zip ties / H20 that I have given them, or the things I have been able to fix so they can ride out.

Aaron
Aaron

March 16, 2019

My friends always give me crap for having my aid bag in my car when we’re not on duty. Same with my extra tools for various emergency’s, I can’t ever quite explain to them the importance of it, but I hope in showing them this post it will change their minds.

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